CSE Course Descriptions

P.O. Box 154         Blue Jay,  CA.           92317
O# (949) 208 – 2979      or      (909) 689 – 6286
Talk live if you have any questions (9am – 5pm – Pacific Time)
E-MAIL:  mboardway@mba-architectural.com
URL:  www.mba-architectural.com
Skype  Handle
:  MICHAELBOARDWAY – MBA

 


Architectural Services
Commercial, Residential, Institutional, Industrial, Hospitality,
Theme Parks,  Spiritual Centers,  Churches

Architectural Exam & Professional Services
Seminars, Workshops, Tele-Seminars, Tutoring, 
Materials,  Consultation, …. 

Architectural Energy Assessments
Walk through assessments & recommendations for a savings for up to a
1,000,000.00 or more  per year (Theme Parks, School Campus, Large Corporations)                                     (Professor Boardway help put together the California Energy Commission in 1978)

(Removing the Physical & Mental Blocks;  Exams, Profession, …)

CALIFORNIA SUPPLEMENTAL EXAM – SEMINARS /LECTURES / WRITTEN EXAM  & CRITIQUES  / WORKSHOPS  / TUTORING / MATERIALS, … (For the New Exam,  also the candidates may audio record Professor Boardway in any or all sessions noted below however video recording will not be allowed)  If you cannot attend,  see Live Tele-Seminars or Recorded Tele-Seminars,  see links for Sessions.

CSE – Cal Supplemental Exam – 2 Workshops: (Reading Material, 55 Category Lecture  & Written Exam with Critiques) (Offered in Southern Calif. only. These two (2) individual intensive workshops focuses on a review of all the reading material and each of the categories of the exam.  Session #1 will be reviewing all the reference material and Category I.  Session #2 will be focusing on Categories II. III & IV as well as a final multiple choice written exam which will be critiqued right after.  This workshop is  limited to only 10 candidates , fills fast – must be pre-registered – no walk-ins please, since material must be downloaded ahead of time.

CSE – Category Lecture:  (On all 55 Categories)
This lecture focuses on all the categories the candidate is tested on as well as test taking techniques. Also the different types of written questions the candidate is tested on and suggested ways to respond.

CSE – Overview Seminar:  (On all Reference Material for the  exam – listed below)
Lecture will be covering all the reading material, reference subjects such as; Calif. Practice Act, Mechanic’s Lien Laws, California Public Contract Code,  General Plan, Essential Services Building Act, Ca. Design Professional’s Liens, Coastal Act,  AIA Contracts, Title 24 All Parts, Ca. Environmental Quality Act, all Project Documents, Legal-Ethical Issues, , etc… . Also test taking techniques will be discussed.

CSE –  Written Exam w/ Critiques: (Testing on all Reference Material & Categories)
The candidate will take a written exam which will typify the real exam and right after the exam then critiques of candidate responses will follow. The questions from the exam, candidate responses as well as the critiques are allowed to be audio recorded (by the candidates recorder), and the candidate can take this recording with them.

CSE – All Day Category / Written Exam w/ Critiques  – Workshop:
(Offered in  Southern Calif. only.
This one day workshop will offer a lecture on each of the Categories of the CSE  and then the Candidate will be tested by a written exam on each category. This will focus on candidate thought process as well as concentration needed for this exam. Candidates responses will be reviewed and discussed immediately following.

CSE – All Day 3 : 1 ( Overview Sem. / Cat Lecture / Written Exam w/ Critiques – Workshop:
(Seminar, Lecture & Written Exam on all Reading Material & Categories)
(Offered in San Bernardino Ca., UNO  (So. Ca.)  & San Francisco Area ( No. Ca.)
(For the So Cal & No Cal – CSE)
This one day workshop will offer three sessions, noted above,  in one day.  The Overview Seminar will discuss all the reference material the candidate is tested on and then the Category Lecture will discuss each of the 55 Categories of the Test Plan of the CSE followed by a Written Exam w/ Critiques.  This one day session will focus on the candidate’s thought process as well as concentration needed for this written multiple choice exam.

Reference Material                                                                                     Source

California Architects Practice Act (Latest Edition)                                    California Architects Board

California Contractors License Law and Reference Book                        Local County Law Library

California Public Contract Code
(State Contract Act 10100 – 10285.5)                                                       Local County Law Library or Leginfo

General Plan
(Government Code, Section 65300 Et. Seq.)                                            Local County Law Library or Leginfo

Essential Services Buildings Seismic Safety Act, Excerpt
(California Health & Safety Code, Sections 16000 – 16023)                      Local County Law Library or Leginfo

California Design Professionals’ Liens
(California Civil Code, Sections 3081.1 – 3081.10)                                     Local County Law Library or Leginfo

California Coastal Act
(Public Resources Code, Section 30000 Et. Seq.)                                     California Coastal Commission or Leginfo

AIA Architect’s Handbook of Professional Practice                                     American Institute of Architects or
American Institute of Architects California Council
2010 California Building Standards Administrative Code
(Part 1, Title 24)*                                                                                         California Building Standards Commission

2010 California Building Code, Volumes 1 & 2 (Part 2, Title 24)*                California Building Standards Commission

2010 California Residential Building Code (Part 2.5, Title 24)*                   California Building Standards Commission

2010 California Electrical Code, (Part 3, Title 24)*                                      California Building Standards Commission

2010 California Mechanical Code, (Part 4, Title 24)*                                   California Building Standards Commission

2010 California Plumbing Code, (Part 5, Title 24)*                                      California Building Standards Commission

2010 California Energy Code (Part 6, Title 24)*                                           California Building Standards Commission

2010 California Historical Building Code (Part 8, Title 24)*                          California Building Standards Commission

2010 California Fire Code (Part 9, Title 24)*                                                California Building Standards Commission

2010 California Existing Building Standards Code (Part 10, Title 24)*         California Building Standards Commission

2010 California Green Building Standards Code (Part 11, Title 24)*            California Building Standards Commission

2010 California Referenced Standards Code (Part 12, Title 24)*                 California Building Standards Commission

California Environmental Quality Act
(Public Resources Code, Section 21000 Et. Seq.)                                        American Council of Engineering Companies or
California Environmental
Resources Evaluation System

State of California Indoor Air Quality Program                                              State of California Indoor Air Quality Program

Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures,
2005 ASCE 7-05                                                                                           Various Sources

Local Government Regulations
(i.e., design review standards, development project regulations,
and/or ordinances)                                                                                         Various Local Sources

 

 

California Architects Board – Supplemental Examination
Test Plan

The Board is mandated to protect the public health, safety, and welfare. The California Supplemental
Examination (CSE) assesses whether applicants for licensure demonstrate minimum standards of
competency necessary to meet the requirements of current architectural practice in California.

The CSE Test Plan was developed using the results of the statewide survey of architectural practice in
California conducted in 2007. The intent of the CSE Test Plan is not to duplicate coverage of general areas
of practice already addressed by the national test, the Architect Registration Examination (ARE). The intent
of the CSE Test Plan is to focus on California-specific aspects of practice; it is therefore neither
comprehensive nor representative of the full scope of architectural practice.

The CSE Test Plan covers important knowledge and ability areas that are tested using a computer-based,
multiple-choice format.

The CSE Test Plan is organized into four primary knowledge categories as shown below. The “Weights”
indicate the percentage of examination points that will be allocated to each category.

Categories and Subcategories                                                                      Weights

I. Context & Predesign                                                                                               16%

II. Regulatory                                                                                                                42%
A. California State Laws, Code, Regulations, and Standards(24%)
B. Other Laws, Codes, Regulations, Standards, Agencies and
Entitlements (18%)

III. Management & Design                                                                                          27%

IV. Construction                                                                                                           15%

 

I. CONTEXT AND PREDESIGN (16%)

This category encompasses the knowledge required to evaluate and respond to the
physical and social context in California. This requires an understanding of natural and
built conditions and their impact on design, including potential mitigations. Additional
knowledge and abilities are those required to develop and utilize program information
that addresses user characteristics and activities and performance objectives.

Knowledge and Ability Statements
1. Knowledge of conditions of the natural environment regulated in California  (e.g., wetlands, coastal regions,
habitats of endangered species) as they relate to design and construction.
2. Knowledge of natural and human-caused hazardous conditions (e.g., seismic activity, fire, winds, flood zone,
hazardous materials) and potential mitigations.
3. Knowledge of health issues related to buildings (e.g., offgassing, mold, adequate ventilation).
4. Knowledge of user characteristics (e.g., varying ages, cultures, abilities, activity requirements).
5. Knowledge of types of stakeholders (e.g., environmental groups, citizens’ advisory committees, neighborhood
and community organizations) concerned about design and construction.
6. Knowledge of project performance objectives (e.g., comfort control, safety and
security, sustainability).
7. Ability to evaluate user activities to determine spatial requirements and adjacencies.
8. Ability to organize and evaluate relevant program information to prepare a final program document.

 

 

 

II. REGULATORY (42%) –

This category includes knowledge of the state, local, regional, and
federal regulatory environments specific to the practice of architecture in California, and
includes knowledge of agencies and entitlement processes.

A. California State Laws, Codes, Regulations, and Standards (24%)
This subcategory encompasses the knowledge required to practice within the regulatory
environment specific to California. This requires an understanding of the California-
specific legal constraints upon design and construction, including a working knowledge
of California building codes, environmental regulations, and lien laws. This also requires
understanding of the requirements of the California Architects Practice Act, including but
not limited to those regarding contracts, responsible control, standard of care, licensing,
and instruments of service.

Knowledge Statements
9. Knowledge of California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) as it relates to design and construction.
10. Knowledge of Essential Services Buildings Seismic Safety Act as it relates to design and construction.
11. Knowledge of what is encompassed by the California Building Standards Code (e.g.,
Building, Electrical, Mechanical, Plumbing, Energy, Historical) and how the CBSC is distinct from the
model codes.
12. Knowledge of structural provisions of the California Building Code.
13. Knowledge of provisions of the California Building Code for anchoring and bracing
nonstructural elements.
14. Knowledge of accessibility provisions of the California Building Code.
15. Knowledge of fire and life safety provisions of the California Building Code.
16. Knowledge of provisions of the California Energy Code.
17. Knowledge of California Health and Safety Code as it relates to design and construction.
18. Knowledge of the Design Professionals and Mechanic’s Lien Laws.
19. Knowledge of other California special regulations relevant to design and construction (e.g.,
water regulations, California Coastal Act, California Clean Air Act, California Public
Contract Code, Field Act, Hospital Facilities Seismic Safety Act).
20. Knowledge of the architect’s responsibilities and requirements for practicing in
California in accordance with the Practice Act (e.g., responsible control, standard of
care, licensing requirements, signing and sealing of documents).
21. Knowledge of the elements of a legal contract as required by the Practice Act.
22. Knowledge of administration of the Practice Act (e.g., examination, licensing, and
enforcement).
23. Knowledge of business and professional requirements of the Practice Act
(e.g., architectural corporations, firm naming, associations, professional conduct).

 

II. REGULATORY (42%) – Continued

B. Other Laws, Codes, Regulations, Standards, Agencies and Entitlements (18%) 

This subcategory encompasses the knowledge required to practice within the local, regional, andfederal regulatory environments in California. This requires an understanding of the legalconstraints upon design and construction, including a working knowledge of how GeneralPlans inform planning and zoning issues and how the Americans with Disabilities Act mayimpact architectural practice. This subcategory also encompasses the knowledge required tointeract with local, regional, and state governing agencies that may have jurisdiction. Thisrequires an understanding of the jurisdictions, procedures, and approval processes of the

agencies, as well as an awareness of the architect’s responsibilities in obtaining approvals.

Knowledge Statements
24. Knowledge of local or regional laws, codes, regulations, and standards (e.g., General
Plan; planning and zoning ordinances; local building ordinances; design guidelines;
Codes, Covenants, and Restrictions [CC&Rs]) relevant to design and construction.
25. Knowledge of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) with regard to how it
impacts architectural practice (e.g., client and architect responsibilities, design and construction).
26. Knowledge of federal laws, codes, and regulations other than ADA (e.g.,
Environmental Protection Agency Regulations, Federal Aviation Administration
regulations, US Army Corps of Engineers regulations) relevant to design and construction.
27. Knowledge of national standards (e.g., UL, ANSI, ASTM, Factory Mutual) relevant
to design and construction.
28. Knowledge of local community development agencies and other authorities that
normally have jurisdiction over design and construction (e.g., building, planning,
public works, police and fire departments).
29. Knowledge of local or regional agencies and other authorities that may have
jurisdiction over design and construction (e.g., Design Review Boards, Air Quality
Management District, County Flood Control District, airport authorities,
Environmental Health Department).
30. Knowledge of California state agencies that have jurisdiction over design and
construction (e.g., Coastal Commission, Water Resources Control Board, Department of
Fish and Game, Air Resources Board, California Department of Transportation).
31. Knowledge of procedures for obtaining approvals from regulatory agencies.
32. Knowledge of interrelationships among various regulatory agencies (e.g., sequence of
approvals, hierarchy of jurisdictions).
33. Knowledge of process for resolving conflicts between agencies or between codes,
regulations, and standards.

 

 

III. MANAGEMENT & DESIGN (27%)

This category encompasses the knowledge required to plan and manage project teams,
including consultants, and to implement procedures for risk management and quality
assurance. This requires an understanding of the architect’s role and responsibilities for
coordinating project teams, an understanding of consultants’ services as they relate to
systems and building design, obtaining agency approvals, and an understanding of how to
limit professional liability exposure. This category also encompasses the knowledge and
abilities required to develop design solutions and prepare design and construction
drawings and documents. This requires an understanding of methods for developing
design solutions collaboratively with clients, users, and stakeholders; an understanding of
the drawings and documents needed for agency approvals; and an awareness of specific
design concerns in California (e.g., nonstructural elements, special structural loading
conditions, environmental control systems, material performance and testing standards).
This category also encompasses knowledge of the bidding process.

Knowledge and Ability Statements
34. Knowledge of consultants’ (e.g., civil, structural, mechanical, electrical, landscaping,
acoustical, traffic) services.
35. Knowledge of architect’s role and responsibilities in coordinating an entire  project team.
36. Knowledge of architect’s role and responsibilities in managing project teams to obtain
necessary agency approvals at the appropriate time.
37. Knowledge of document checking and review procedures for quality assurance (in-
house and external).
38. Knowledge of how practicing within the standard of care limits professional liability exposure.
39. Knowledge of methods for developing design solutions with involvement of client,
users, consultants, and stakeholders.
40. Knowledge of contents of design drawings and related documents required for agency approvals.
41. Knowledge of nonstructural elements as defined by the California Building Code (e.g.,
fixtures and equipment items, nonbearing partitions, suspended ceilings).
42. Ability to identify implications of special structural loading conditions (e.g., heavy
equipment, snow, library shelving).
43. Knowledge of environmental control systems (e.g., energy management, occupant
comfort and control).
44. Knowledge of material characteristics, performance, and testing standards.
45. Ability to prepare construction documents appropriate to project type.
46. Knowledge of construction bidding and negotiation processes.

 

 

IV. CONSTRUCTION (15%)

This category encompasses the knowledge and abilities required to perform construction
contract administration services. This requires an understanding of the architect’s role
and responsibilities during construction, including knowledge of procedures for resolving
conflicts, implementing changes, managing construction costs and schedules, and
including California-specific special inspections and testing. Also requires knowledge of
performing project close-out procedures, including understanding of lien laws.

Knowledge and Ability Statements
47. Knowledge of interrelationships among owner, architect, and contractor during construction.
48. Knowledge of the limits of the architect’s role and responsibilities during construction
(e.g., directing subcontractors, means and methods).
49. Knowledge of construction conflict resolution strategies (e.g., mediation, arbitration, litigation).
50. Knowledge of procedures for implementing changes during construction
(e.g., directives, supplemental instructions, change orders).
51. Knowledge of procedures for monitoring construction costs and schedules
(e.g., reviewing and certifying payments to contractor, reviewing lien releases).
52. Knowledge of procedures for performing project close-out (e.g., Certificate of
Substantial Completion, Notice of Completion, final lien releases).
53. Knowledge of elements of California construction laws (e.g., lien requirements,
minimum warranty periods).
54. Knowledge of code-required special inspections and testing (e.g., field welding, high
strength concrete).
55. Ability to provide construction contract administration services appropriate to
project type.